toebells:

jesuschristgrl

trueromancekillers:

treecko007:

bittenlipsandbrokenhearts:

Get the fuck out

Ahh

MOTHER OF GOD DRAGONS!!

(Source: iraffiruse, via the-goddamazon)

Anonymous said: Do you know any good films/novels about Native American women? Pocahontas was clearly full of shit.

angrywocunited:

I’m only going to list books because a lot of films like to perpetuate racist/sexual stereotypes of Native women so finding films that don’t perpetuate these stereotypes is immensely difficult. Maybe our followers can help?

Books: 

-G

fogo-av:

itsgabywithoneb:

Negritud en México 

Probably the documentary over Afromexicans that I’ve liked the most. Its in Spanish but it talks about not just la Costa Chica (what most documentaries about Afromexicans focus on) but about African and West Indian immigrants AND Black Seminoles, something I hadn’t seen mentioned before. Its only 11 minutes long but the full documentary is supposed to be uploaded eventually.

Also its just nice to be able to share this with my mom, she’s from Durango, normally thought to be predominantly white or mestizo, but she herself is [visibly] afromestizo. I’ve read about Black Seminoles having been in Durango and Coahuila and its just nice to be able to share this with her when I know that despite facing discrimination and racism due to her hair and skin, no one ever spoke about black ancestry. Instead, it was attributed to the an indigenous (Tepehuano and Tarahumara) ancestor here or there, more specifically “Si pues tu mama esta haci de negra por que tu tia [insert diff name every time] era india..piel negra.. pera era india,” hmm.

Wait.

(via fyqueerlatinxs)

indiohistorian:

If you haven’t seen the trailer of Jerrold Tarog’s “Heneral Luna,” and you’re a Philippine history enthusiast, please do. It may perhaps be one of the films set in the Philippine-American War that we could be proud of. We only have a few films set in that historical period, and not that many people know of the Philippine-American War. The film is set to be released in 2015. The quality of the film is seamless, and because it’s a Jerrold Tarog film, I’m expecting a down-to-earth treatment to the historical figures. His film Sana Dati is a favorite. 

When I saw the photos of the cast of Heneral Luna on Facebook, I couldn’t help but gasp at some of the actors’ portrayal of their character. To show you what I mean, I took the photos of the cast and put it side by side with the actual photos of the historical figures they portrayed. (I hope the director won’t mind). Look, and be amazed!!! 

(1) John Arcilla as General Antonio Luna

(2) Epy Quizon as Apolinario Mabini

—> This so far is my favorite. From the dress down to the chair he is sitting at, Epy Quizon is perfect for the Mabini role. 

(3) Paolo Avelino as  General Gregorio del Pilar

(4) Mon Confiado as President Emilio Aguinaldo

(5) Nonie Buencamino as Felipe Buencamino 

(6) Joem Bascon as Colonel Francisco “Paco” Roman

(7) Alex Medina as Captain Jose Bernal

(8) Leo Martinez as Pedro Paterno

(9) Ketchup Eusebio as Captain Pedro Janolino

(10) Lorenz Martinez as General Tomas Mascardo

(LEFT photos are from the "Heneral Luna" Facebook Fanpage. RIGHT photos are historical photos from various sources. Photos belong to their respective owners). 

the-goddamazon:

robregal:

glasmond:



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 Reblogging again because there are some new ones and put them together in one post.

This post is golden. A1 shit right here.

Accurate as fuck holy shit.

mitambor:

blackaroundtheworld:

Since the 15th century, San Basilio de Palenque, Bolivar, #Colombia is considered the first village of free slaves in America. The #palenqueras preserve the #African traditions brought by the slaves who disembarked on these regions of South America.
The palenqueros live by the norms of the social organization inherited from their African #ancestors: the ma-kuagro, according to which every society is divided into age groups to allow the division of labor, the protection of the territory, and the preservation of traditions based on honesty, solidarity, and a collective spirit. The #Palenque language I the only #creole language in the world based on #Spanish and African elements.

I had the great honor to visit this magical place! Palenqueros are proud of their identity and have an amazing carnaval in October to commemorate their culture and of course the music!

mitambor:

blackaroundtheworld:

Since the 15th century, San Basilio de Palenque, Bolivar, #Colombia is considered the first village of free slaves in America. The #palenqueras preserve the #African traditions brought by the slaves who disembarked on these regions of South America.

The palenqueros live by the norms of the social organization inherited from their African #ancestors: the ma-kuagro, according to which every society is divided into age groups to allow the division of labor, the protection of the territory, and the preservation of traditions based on honesty, solidarity, and a collective spirit.
The #Palenque language I the only #creole language in the world based on #Spanish and African elements.

I had the great honor to visit this magical place! Palenqueros are proud of their identity and have an amazing carnaval in October to commemorate their culture and of course the music!

(via thisisnotlatinx)

thotstothinkabout:

All Power To The People (Released: 1996)
Japanese-American Human Rights Activist Yuri Kochiyama

Rest in Power. Wish I would have learned about her growing up…

(Source: exgynocraticgrrl, via entropyoftheuniverse)

Tony Porter: A Call To Men
"Tony is the original visionary and co-founder behind A CALL TO MEN: The National Association of Men and Women Committed to Ending Violence Against Women. He is the author of "Well Meaning Men...Breaking Out of the Man Box - Ending Violence Against Women" and the visionary for the book, NFL Dads Dedicated to Daughters.

Tony's message of accountability is welcome and supported by many grassroots and established organizations. He’s currently working with numerous domestic and sexual violence programs, the National Football League, the National Basketball Association, colleges and universities around the country. He has worked with the United States Military Academy at West Point and the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis.

Tony is an international lecturer for the U.S. State Department having worked in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, United Kingdom and Brazil. In addition, he has been a guest presenter for the United Nations' Commission on the Status of Women and has been a script consultant for Law & Order: Special Victims Unit." - (x)

(Source: exgynocraticgrrl, via the-goddamazon)

so-treu:

antiblacknessisatheory:

!!!!!!!!!This Saturday (September 6th, 2014) at 11am EST!!!!!!!!

Our first teach-in will be an exploration of the definition and nature of antiblackness - its history as a theory, its history as a structuring logic of the modern world, its reality as…

(Source: angrylatinxsunited)

chlorodream:

lady-of-redemption:

He did it. He actually managed to describe how it feels to live with depression and suicidal tendencies.

this is really, really important

(Source: cantcontrolthegay, via thekrissychula)

thinkmexican:

Free Escuelita Zapatista Textbook: Autonomous Government II
DOWNLOAD HERE
For those who couldn’t attend last year’s Escuelita Zapatista, here’s your chance to study from the very same textbooks given to students.
In this second text, Autonomous Government II, studies autonomous education, government, and health; management of projects; support from solidarity brothers and sisters, and more. More textbooks to be uploaded as they become available.
via Intercontinental Cry Magazine

thinkmexican:

Free Escuelita Zapatista Textbook: Autonomous Government II

DOWNLOAD HERE

For those who couldn’t attend last year’s Escuelita Zapatista, here’s your chance to study from the very same textbooks given to students.

In this second text, Autonomous Government II, studies autonomous education, government, and health; management of projects; support from solidarity brothers and sisters, and more. More textbooks to be uploaded as they become available.

via Intercontinental Cry Magazine

(via thisisnotlatinx)

ukpuru:

blood—sport:

Important things from Igbohistory Instagram. European colonialism has, and still continues to dismantle the myriad of sophisticated social constructs upheld by so many African ethnicities, by presenting Africa as a unit by choosing to ignore the huge ocean of differences between ethnic groups, let alone countries.

Interesting fact: Many African ethnic groups, kingdoms, and states were referred to as ‘countries’ before the rise of colonial powers throughout Africa. They were okay as ‘countries’ when slaves and other goods were being traded. You’ll hear of the Ebo country, Benin Country, Whydah Country and so on when reading pre-1850 writing. If you label a kingdom or a state a ‘tribe’ this those what is described above but also implies there was no major or important political organisation. ‘Tribe’ made/makes indigenous African states and ethnic affiliations sound petty and unimportant. Imagine calling the Edo or Songhai people a tribe when their empires have wielded more power than most of the world ever has? But why would you call them countries when you’re trying to impose your own country on them?

(via blackwomenworldhistory)