parentsproject:

by Cara Giaimo

*****

Language plays a huge part in how we understand and describe the world around us, and how we communicate that understanding to others. Because of this, it can be easy to forget that the dictionary isn’t some infallible, unchangeable document handed…

"The cultures of people of color are either packaged for consumption or called upon to fill cultural and spiritual voids of Eurocentrism."

Michael Vavrus

That shit blew my mind and made understanding cultural appropriation way clearer for me. 

(via thisisnotjapan)

(Source: ladylarkin, via the-goddamazon)

the-goddamazon:

theblackoaksyndicate:

carrionofcats:

ghost-of-algren:

nodamncatnodamncradle:

downto142:

frettedtoflame:

renrevenge:



I’M FUCKING SCREAMING OMGGGGGG THE TIME HAS COME FOR THE 90S TO ROMANTICIZED BY NON-90S KIDS FUCK

I feel like a legend.

….is anyone gonna tell them they had foundation in 1994 and belly tops were like REALLY big or are we just letting that lay?
"The 90s: When People Were Happy With Themselves"

"When punks were the cool kids, not the outcasts" is a masterpiece of missing the point

I’m so mad at this.  like hi, lets talk about the foundation of the 90’s.  it was either this powder shit or you had stick foundation that you rubbed all over and yeah everyone wore it.  plus lip liner, no lipstick and gloss on top.  
and um what about daisy dukes?  yall think you were the first?  short shorts have been around a LONG time.  mariah in the heartbreaker video is proof our fabulous 90’s skimpy fashion. fuck you.
punks were the cool kids?  um what?  like go away.  
also “kids cared more about music”?  right, cuz the tipper gore mom fandom on 60 minutes talking about fuck bracelets and the power of cliques wasn’t a thing. or you know how the whole nation was terrified of their kids getting AIDs  cuz of “crazy raves”
you children stay away form the 90s!  you stay away and stop ruining my dystopia with your shitty pop punk glasses!

I’m still waiting for Jellies to come back.

This whole post is godly. Legendary. Iconic. Our time has come.

the-goddamazon:

theblackoaksyndicate:

carrionofcats:

ghost-of-algren:

nodamncatnodamncradle:

downto142:

frettedtoflame:

renrevenge:

I’M FUCKING SCREAMING OMGGGGGG THE TIME HAS COME FOR THE 90S TO ROMANTICIZED BY NON-90S KIDS FUCK

I feel like a legend.

….is anyone gonna tell them they had foundation in 1994 and belly tops were like REALLY big or are we just letting that lay?

"The 90s: When People Were Happy With Themselves"

"When punks were the cool kids, not the outcasts" is a masterpiece of missing the point

I’m so mad at this.  like hi, lets talk about the foundation of the 90’s.  it was either this powder shit or you had stick foundation that you rubbed all over and yeah everyone wore it.  plus lip liner, no lipstick and gloss on top.  

and um what about daisy dukes?  yall think you were the first?  short shorts have been around a LONG time.  mariah in the heartbreaker video is proof our fabulous 90’s skimpy fashion. fuck you.

punks were the cool kids?  um what?  like go away.  

also “kids cared more about music”?  right, cuz the tipper gore mom fandom on 60 minutes talking about fuck bracelets and the power of cliques wasn’t a thing. or you know how the whole nation was terrified of their kids getting AIDs  cuz of “crazy raves”

you children stay away form the 90s!  you stay away and stop ruining my dystopia with your shitty pop punk glasses!

I’m still waiting for Jellies to come back.

This whole post is godly. Legendary. Iconic. Our time has come.

(Source: theacheofmodernism)

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn

OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).
ANYWAY.
Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.
On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.
Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.
After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.
Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.
And now you know Robert Smalls.

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn


OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).

ANYWAY.

Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.

On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.

Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.

After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.

Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.

And now you know Robert Smalls.

(via lorilevaughn)

littlelolawantsyou:

blvckexcelllence:

mxtori:

businessinsider:

7 QUESTIONS YOU SHOULD ASK AT THE END OF EVERY JOB INTERVIEW.

Click here to find out why these questions help you.

This is so important!

I never know what to ask and end up looking like a fool cause I don’t have a question prepared.

Don’t be me.

Oooh yes these are good

Asking those questions got me my job!

(via meanwhilegradstudents)

profkew:

Historic Marker ~ Kristopher Monroe
The Weeping Time: A forgotten history of the largest slave auction ever on American soil

Two miles west of downtown Savannah, Georgia, sits a historical marker in the center of a small plot of a fenced in city park. The triangular park measures not more than a fifth of an acre. The surrounding neighborhood is one of the most distressed and depressed sections of the city.
The marker was dedicated on March 3, 2008, 149 years after the slave auction occurred, and at the commemoration ceremony then-mayor Otis Johnson—only the second African-American to hold that office—offered up a short speech honoring the enslaved men and women whose labor helped build the oldest city in the state of Georgia. At the ceremony a local man handed out dirt from Nigeria to be sprinkled around the marker and Mayor Johnson poured water over the dirt to consecrate the ground.

And that’s it for the city’s commemoration of the event known as the Weeping Time. Contrast that with the towering monument to the Confederate dead that has stood for over a century smack in the center of one of the city’s largest public parks.
The Weeping Time acquired its name colloquially, by the slaves and their descendants, because of reports that the sky opened up and poured down rain for the full two days of the auction. It was said that the heavens were weeping for the inhumanity that was being committed.
The event wasn’t just notable because of the size of the auction. In 1859 the country was on the verge of a national bloodbath, and the historic threads that weave through the story of the Weeping Time are so far-reaching and remarkable, it’s perplexing that more hasn’t been written or remembered about this time.
Read more here.

profkew:

Historic Marker ~ Kristopher Monroe

The Weeping Time: A forgotten history of the largest slave auction ever on American soil

Two miles west of downtown Savannah, Georgia, sits a historical marker in the center of a small plot of a fenced in city park. The triangular park measures not more than a fifth of an acre. The surrounding neighborhood is one of the most distressed and depressed sections of the city.

The marker was dedicated on March 3, 2008, 149 years after the slave auction occurred, and at the commemoration ceremony then-mayor Otis Johnson—only the second African-American to hold that office—offered up a short speech honoring the enslaved men and women whose labor helped build the oldest city in the state of Georgia. At the ceremony a local man handed out dirt from Nigeria to be sprinkled around the marker and Mayor Johnson poured water over the dirt to consecrate the ground.

And that’s it for the city’s commemoration of the event known as the Weeping Time. Contrast that with the towering monument to the Confederate dead that has stood for over a century smack in the center of one of the city’s largest public parks.

The Weeping Time acquired its name colloquially, by the slaves and their descendants, because of reports that the sky opened up and poured down rain for the full two days of the auction. It was said that the heavens were weeping for the inhumanity that was being committed.

The event wasn’t just notable because of the size of the auction. In 1859 the country was on the verge of a national bloodbath, and the historic threads that weave through the story of the Weeping Time are so far-reaching and remarkable, it’s perplexing that more hasn’t been written or remembered about this time.

Read more here.

(via boygeorgemichaelbluth)

"

Once again, Caucasian does not mean white, and using it to mean white is actually racist.

There are real Caucasian people who live in the Caucasus region, and they are not white.

"

omfgcate on this post

Learn stuff!

(via writeworld)

THANK YOU. Don’t call me white & don’t equate my people to whiteness. 

(via whitegirlsaintshit)

well my personal question if i were so bold would be what do they pass as and act like once they get to the U.S. but y’all know i dont like to cause trouble

(via so-treu)

(via so-treu)

thefemaletyrant:

cheersapplespears:

thefemaletyrant:

everything-naija:

blood—sport:

Important things from Igbohistory Instagram. European colonialism has, and still continues to dismantle the myriad of sophisticated social constructs upheld by so many African ethnicities, by presenting Africa as a unit by choosing to ignore the huge ocean of differences between ethnic groups, let alone countries.

Did Igbohistory quote the person who actually wrote this? As I read this, I had the feeling that I’d read the exact words before and not from Igbohistory. In fact I believe that I shared a link to the original essay on my tumblr years ago but I can’t find it now, I will sha…

I was taught this in my African History class, and since then i stopped referring to my people (Yoruba) and other ethic groups of Africa and the world as tribes. This large groups of people are nations with strong rich history and deserve to be respected as such. 

i do hope that igbohistory doesn’t claim that this is their own work, and they simply forgot to cite where the information comes from. 

I updated! I made a mistake pls, it was very similar to another essay I’d read but not the same.

(via the-goddamazon)

dontbearuiner:

lawebloca:

Friends

This is a very important post.

(via the-goddamazon)

cross-connect:

Goblin Spider by Forest Rogers

Goblin Spider was inspired by a folktale and traditional Japanese ukiyo-e prints. Elaborate hairpins made me think “legs,” of course. I also noticed that many beauties were depicted holding a bit of folded fabric or tissue in their mouths. This was a come-hither symbol, sufficiently demure to get past court censors but widely understood as erotic (don’t attempt it with Bounty Duratowel — it loses in translation). Thus, mouse in mouth. 

via Muddy colours

Posted to Cross Connect by Andrew

(via face-down-asgard-up)

high-energy-introvert:

•go to the bathroom to escape

•feel very uncomfortable without a phone or some other crutch

•dwell on a small awkward moment for much longer than necessary

•never go to any social event without a person that makes you feel comfortable

•follow said person way too…

"Originally, in the 20s and 30s, the stereotype of someone who was schizophrenic was the housewife who was sad and withdrawn, and would not do her duties as a housewife; would not do the housework. This was the typical case of schizophrenia. And then, in the 60s, something shifted. The actual criteria for schizophrenia shifted. A lot of psychiatrists and hospitals and police were encountering young, angry black men who were part of the civil rights movement. Who were part of the riots – the uprisings – in the Black Power movement. Who were angry. Who were perceiving a conspiracy of power against them, that was called paranoia. They would see it is white privilege, but it was called paranoia. And so we actually see the diagnositc criteria for schizophrenia change. So now you have anger and paranoia and hostility being included as criteria, whereas 30 years before they hadn’t been. Because the stereotype has changed. So there’s a way in which the DSM and the perspectives of the psychiatrists and the doctors who were giving these diagnoses is thoroughly politically constructed, and thoroughly dependent on the culture and context that they’re within."

Will Hall at Unitarian Church Vancouver Canada March 2012 - Transcript | Madness Radio (via blinko)

for anyone interested in reading more about how schizophrenia moved from being a diagnosis assigned to white, middle-class women to one used to pathologize and institutionalize noncompliant black men in the 1960s, jonathan metzl’s the protest psychosis: how schizophrenia became a black disease is a good place to start. i have a PDF scan of it, too — just ask.

(via onegirlrhumba)

(via so-treu)

thetpr:

orawest:

abstrackafricana:

iwillmakeyouskinny:

beyseybey:

Biggest plot twist


i will never not repost this.

Whaaattttt?????

LMAO this video though

thetpr:

orawest:

abstrackafricana:

iwillmakeyouskinny:

beyseybey:

Biggest plot twist

i will never not repost this.

Whaaattttt?????

LMAO this video though

(Source: 4gifs, via orchidassassin)

a-spoon-is-born:

bespectacledbibliophile:

medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!

Leo and Diane Dillon

Various Illustrations

Leo and Diane Dillon were one of the greatest illustration teams in the history of Fantasy Art. Books that have used their illustrations for cover or inside art include an edition of the Narnia books, Garth Nix’s Sabriel, Lirael and Abhorsen, Her Stories and The Girl Who Spun Gold by Virginia Hamilton, The Earthsea Trilogy by Ursula K. LeGuin, Aida by Leontyne Price, The Girl Who Dreamed Only Geese by Howard A. Norman, and many, many more.

There is a blog dedicated to archiving their work here.

I cannot say this enough: read Her Stories. It’s a beautiful book, and the illustrations range from elegant (like the mermaid picture above) to downright terrifying.

I found it in the library when I was nine, and I still revisit it now, fifteen years later.

I own it and it is absolutely incredible.

(via blue-author)