csrcalloway:

Man, you know every generation thinks they had it great, and I’m not gonna pretend we didn’t have terrible things (I mean, look at any yearbook photo) and we didn’t have awesome things (all I have to say is “Zoom, zoom, zoom”), but something we most definitely had, was representation. We were major characters on shows and in movies, not regulated to an entertainment ghetto or completely ignored. Growing up, you could see yourself on “Ghostwriter,” “All That,” and “California Dreams.” We were saving the world from aliens, dancing in Mickey Mouse ears, telling horror stories around campfires, you name it!
So this image I commissioned from the always fantastic autumn-sacura, in tribute not just to the phenomenal actors pictured here (the late Thuy Trang, the charming Mario Lopez, the vocal bible Brandy Norwood, and the guy-who-probably-starred-in-something-you-love Mr. Dante Basco), nor the army of unsung performers who showed up on our screens repping us, our cousins, our friends, our crushes. This image is a tribute to US, for being varied, for being awesome, for representing OURSELVES just by leaving our house in the morning, proud of our skin, our background, our hair, and the things that make us US.
Just a reminder…#REPRESENTATIONMATTERS because the world needs to see all of the beauty we bring. So if you are a creator, remember how if felt when you saw someone had hair like you, lips like you, a story like you, and pass that on to someone else. Bring that beauty to those who will read your words, watch your vision, and step into your world. It makes the world we eventually step back into that much more vibrant.

csrcalloway:

Man, you know every generation thinks they had it great, and I’m not gonna pretend we didn’t have terrible things (I mean, look at any yearbook photo) and we didn’t have awesome things (all I have to say is “Zoom, zoom, zoom”), but something we most definitely had, was representation. We were major characters on shows and in movies, not regulated to an entertainment ghetto or completely ignored. Growing up, you could see yourself on “Ghostwriter,” “All That,” and “California Dreams.” We were saving the world from aliens, dancing in Mickey Mouse ears, telling horror stories around campfires, you name it!

So this image I commissioned from the always fantastic autumn-sacura, in tribute not just to the phenomenal actors pictured here (the late Thuy Trang, the charming Mario Lopez, the vocal bible Brandy Norwood, and the guy-who-probably-starred-in-something-you-love Mr. Dante Basco), nor the army of unsung performers who showed up on our screens repping us, our cousins, our friends, our crushes. This image is a tribute to US, for being varied, for being awesome, for representing OURSELVES just by leaving our house in the morning, proud of our skin, our background, our hair, and the things that make us US.

Just a reminder…#REPRESENTATIONMATTERS because the world needs to see all of the beauty we bring. So if you are a creator, remember how if felt when you saw someone had hair like you, lips like you, a story like you, and pass that on to someone else. Bring that beauty to those who will read your words, watch your vision, and step into your world. It makes the world we eventually step back into that much more vibrant.

(via taterthotsz)

aechlys:

Ok kids, listen up. I’m about to explain to you, to the best of my ability, why there are 40,000 people protesting in Tokyo’s Nagata-cho as I type this, why it matters, and why you should be talking about it, too.

image

What Started This Protest?

The short answer —> Japan’s…

aliilovely:

leviathans-in-the-tardis:

you don’t realise how much tumblr has changed your view on things until you spend time with friends who don’t have tumblr and they say something and you’re just like

oh

This

(via latinagabi)

the-goddamazon:

gallifrey-feels:

balladofwormzlp:

bakedandbipolar:

every.single.one.of.these

ladies and gentlemen, the most accurate post on tumblr

opium

Weed and toobacco is so accurate. Acid, ecstasy, and shrooms I can vouch for too. LOL

(Source: camo-shorts)

"women of color between the ages of 36 and 49 have, on average, $5 in assets compared with white women’s $42,600, according to a report by the Insight Center for Community Economic Development."

— Michel Martin, On balancing career and family as a woman of color (via sociolab)

(Source: cielito-lindo, via latinagabi)

Anonymous said: Can you list some good sj blogs?

racismschool:

onlyblackgirl:

Some of them aren’t necessarily “social justice” but just poc positive/empowering blogs. 

forblackgirls

reclaimingthenativetag

reclaimingthelatinatag

angrylatinxsunited

angryafricangirlsunited

angrytaiwanesegirlsunited

angrywocunited

angrylatinxsunited

thisiseverydayracism

thisisnotlatinx

empoweredpeopleofcolorunite

theprettypoc

allthingsblackwomen

postracialcomments

racismschool

pocineurope

whitepeoplestealingculture

reverseracist

wocinsolidarity

weareallmixedup

pplofcolor

blackhistoryarthistory

blackhistoryeveryday

yoisthisracist

cultureisnotacostume

culturalappropriationon

lovelyandbrown

weloveblackgirls

I’m extremely honored to be included with such prestigious blogs/bloggers. Thank you so much for the vote of confidence!

((hug)) & *fist bump*

seriouslystella:

tw-koreanhistory:

A Multiracial Farewell to ‘Mama’
February 12, 1999


Anyone who shopped at Chung-bok Hong’s small market here more than once quickly got used to calling Mrs. Hong what the rest of the working-class neighborhood did: ”Mama.”
It did not matter that she was a Korean-American and that most of her customers were black in a city where the two groups have a recent history of bad blood. She treated young and old with respect and kindness and they treated her the same. Mama knew that everyone was chasing the American Dream; some people just ran a little faster or had better running shoes.
When young mothers came in with no money for diapers or milk, Mama put the items in a bag and whispered, ”Pay me next time,” and they did.
When the teen-age boys came in with their baggy pants and their trying-to-look-tough faces, Mama smiled at them and went about her business. After all, she had a son of her own.
”She didn’t follow you around the store like you were going to steal something,” Terrence Smith, 18, said today outside the dark and locked market. ”She treated you like a person. She didn’t treat you like a color. I’m going to miss her.”
Mrs. Hong, 52, was killed last week during a robbery at the store in South-Central Los Angeles. Today, a few blocks away, black, Korean and Hispanic Angelenos, sitting side by side, gathered at St. Brigid Roman Catholic Church for her funeral.
Even in death, Mama was still making strangers feel like family.
Mrs. Hong did not live in the neighborhood, but her husband, Chung-pyo, wanted her funeral held there so her customers of more than 15 years could say goodbye, said City Councilman Mark Ridley-Thomas, who represents the neighborhood where Mrs. Hong was killed.
”This is incredible,” Mr. Ridley-Thomas said as he watched the mourners on the steps of the church waiting to hug Mr. Hong and softly cry into his ear.
Mr. Ridley-Thomas said the scene of sorrow was in sharp contrast to the angry pictures after the shooting of a young unarmed black girl by a Korean shop owner in 1991 and the burning and looting of Korean-owned businesses in black and Hispanic neighborhoods during the riots of 1992 and the suspicions and the fear on all sides ever since.
”That’s the stereotype of African-American and Korean-American relations,” he said. ”But this radically contradicts that. This can set an example of what ought to be.”
During the riots, among the worst the country has seen, the Hong store was not touched by rage or fire. And that is one reason that people in the neighborhood believe that the two people sought in Mrs. Hong’s killing, described as a pair of young Hispanic men, came from somewhere else.
”Everyone who knew her,” said Joyce Rankins, 51, ”would do her no harm.”
More than 300 people, most of them black, filed into the church. Then the pallbearers, six uniformed city bus drivers who were frequent customers of the market, wheeled her coffin to the altar.
Mrs. Hong’s son, Edward Hong, 25, who was wounded in the leg during the robbery and was walking with a cane, said there was no mystery to his mother’s popularity in the neighborhood.
”She just treated everyone with kindness and respect,” he said. ”It’s the way everyone else should be treated. Everyone says this is so unique. But the thing is, this is the way everything should be.”
At about the same time the sounds of ”Amazing Grace” floated through the church, Kenneth Wheeler parked his jeep in front of Mrs. Hong’s market. Ever since the shooting, people from the neighborhood have stopped at the store to leave flowers, candles, Bibles and messages of support and tribute on the sidewalk.
”I was going to the service at the church,” Mr. Wheeler said, ”but there was no place to park. There are too many people, so I came here to pay my respects.”
Mr. Wheeler peered through the security bars and looked at a handmade sign hanging in the window, ”Thursday Closed. Mama’s Funeral.” Below that were two wanted posters, in English and Spanish, offering a $25,000 reward for Mama’s suspected killers. Then Mr. Wheeler walked around the side of the building and pointed out a wall covered in tributes, prayers and vows of vengeance.
”I will always love you, Mama,” one read.
”To Mama,” another began. ”A loving angel who specialized in the role of helping others.”
Nearby, written in red, was a promise, ”We will find killers — and they will pay.”
Mr. Wheeler said the message was written by local gang members.
”Whoever killed her,” Mr. Wheeler said, ”must have thought they could come to this community and kill a Korean store owner and we wouldn’t care. They made a big mistake. They picked the wrong store and they picked the wrong Korean.”
But there was another message on the wall that sounded much more like Mama. ”Forgive them Lord,” it said, ”for they know not what they do.”
Photos: Janet Hong, 14, above, was comforted after her mother’s funeral by Mary Washington Solomon as her father and an unidentified relative stood by. At the service, left, a store worker, Charles Lee McCelleary, left a flower. (Photographs by Monica Almeida/The New York Times)  

via http://www.nytimes.com/1999/02/12/us/a-multiracial-farewell-to-mama.html
pic source: http://iamkoream.com/20-years-counting/


You know, I remember this. My parents owned a store in/near K-town when I was a child, but they left the area before I started preschool because they were worried that it was dangerous. And then the LA riots happened less than five years later. Chung-bok Hong’s murder happened during my high school years. I remember feeling so grieved, and yet so glad my parents didn’t work in K-town anymore. I remember being worried about them every Sunday morning, when they went to downtown LA to pass out donuts and hot drinks to the homeless. 
I have a lot of feelings about this and very few coherent words. I think of my friend, whose mother was killed while manning her business. She was killed for $35 worth of clothes. I think of another good friend whose mother was robbed at gun point while in the passenger seat of her car. Her attacker broke into her car and drove off with her in it, demanding money from her. I think of my own mother, who often does the accounting and banking for her business every week. And the times she’s been attacked for money. The bruises they left. 
I think of every moment my mother or my friend’s mothers harassed us about studying harder, about getting well-paying jobs, about not living our lives the way they had to live theirs. 
I’m so glad Chung-bok Hong was able to live with so much generosity and grace. But I am so damn tired of seeing women I know and love get killed or beaten while trying to make a living for their families and children. I’m tired of seeing Korean women get killed while trying to run a business and raise a family. I know this story is fifteen years old, but it keeps happening and I am so weary. I’m so tired of the anti-Asian sentiment in the US that keeps people from seeing us, from seeing my mother and her friends, from seeing my people as human beings. 

seriouslystella:

tw-koreanhistory:

A Multiracial Farewell to ‘Mama’

February 12, 1999

Anyone who shopped at Chung-bok Hong’s small market here more than once quickly got used to calling Mrs. Hong what the rest of the working-class neighborhood did: ”Mama.”

It did not matter that she was a Korean-American and that most of her customers were black in a city where the two groups have a recent history of bad blood. She treated young and old with respect and kindness and they treated her the same. Mama knew that everyone was chasing the American Dream; some people just ran a little faster or had better running shoes.

When young mothers came in with no money for diapers or milk, Mama put the items in a bag and whispered, ”Pay me next time,” and they did.

When the teen-age boys came in with their baggy pants and their trying-to-look-tough faces, Mama smiled at them and went about her business. After all, she had a son of her own.

”She didn’t follow you around the store like you were going to steal something,” Terrence Smith, 18, said today outside the dark and locked market. ”She treated you like a person. She didn’t treat you like a color. I’m going to miss her.”

Mrs. Hong, 52, was killed last week during a robbery at the store in South-Central Los Angeles. Today, a few blocks away, black, Korean and Hispanic Angelenos, sitting side by side, gathered at St. Brigid Roman Catholic Church for her funeral.

Even in death, Mama was still making strangers feel like family.

Mrs. Hong did not live in the neighborhood, but her husband, Chung-pyo, wanted her funeral held there so her customers of more than 15 years could say goodbye, said City Councilman Mark Ridley-Thomas, who represents the neighborhood where Mrs. Hong was killed.

”This is incredible,” Mr. Ridley-Thomas said as he watched the mourners on the steps of the church waiting to hug Mr. Hong and softly cry into his ear.

Mr. Ridley-Thomas said the scene of sorrow was in sharp contrast to the angry pictures after the shooting of a young unarmed black girl by a Korean shop owner in 1991 and the burning and looting of Korean-owned businesses in black and Hispanic neighborhoods during the riots of 1992 and the suspicions and the fear on all sides ever since.

”That’s the stereotype of African-American and Korean-American relations,” he said. ”But this radically contradicts that. This can set an example of what ought to be.”

During the riots, among the worst the country has seen, the Hong store was not touched by rage or fire. And that is one reason that people in the neighborhood believe that the two people sought in Mrs. Hong’s killing, described as a pair of young Hispanic men, came from somewhere else.

”Everyone who knew her,” said Joyce Rankins, 51, ”would do her no harm.”

More than 300 people, most of them black, filed into the church. Then the pallbearers, six uniformed city bus drivers who were frequent customers of the market, wheeled her coffin to the altar.

Mrs. Hong’s son, Edward Hong, 25, who was wounded in the leg during the robbery and was walking with a cane, said there was no mystery to his mother’s popularity in the neighborhood.

”She just treated everyone with kindness and respect,” he said. ”It’s the way everyone else should be treated. Everyone says this is so unique. But the thing is, this is the way everything should be.”

At about the same time the sounds of ”Amazing Grace” floated through the church, Kenneth Wheeler parked his jeep in front of Mrs. Hong’s market. Ever since the shooting, people from the neighborhood have stopped at the store to leave flowers, candles, Bibles and messages of support and tribute on the sidewalk.

”I was going to the service at the church,” Mr. Wheeler said, ”but there was no place to park. There are too many people, so I came here to pay my respects.”

Mr. Wheeler peered through the security bars and looked at a handmade sign hanging in the window, ”Thursday Closed. Mama’s Funeral.” Below that were two wanted posters, in English and Spanish, offering a $25,000 reward for Mama’s suspected killers. Then Mr. Wheeler walked around the side of the building and pointed out a wall covered in tributes, prayers and vows of vengeance.

”I will always love you, Mama,” one read.

”To Mama,” another began. ”A loving angel who specialized in the role of helping others.”

Nearby, written in red, was a promise, ”We will find killers — and they will pay.”

Mr. Wheeler said the message was written by local gang members.

”Whoever killed her,” Mr. Wheeler said, ”must have thought they could come to this community and kill a Korean store owner and we wouldn’t care. They made a big mistake. They picked the wrong store and they picked the wrong Korean.”

But there was another message on the wall that sounded much more like Mama. ”Forgive them Lord,” it said, ”for they know not what they do.”

Photos: Janet Hong, 14, above, was comforted after her mother’s funeral by Mary Washington Solomon as her father and an unidentified relative stood by. At the service, left, a store worker, Charles Lee McCelleary, left a flower. (Photographs by Monica Almeida/The New York Times)  

via http://www.nytimes.com/1999/02/12/us/a-multiracial-farewell-to-mama.html

pic source: http://iamkoream.com/20-years-counting/

You know, I remember this. My parents owned a store in/near K-town when I was a child, but they left the area before I started preschool because they were worried that it was dangerous. And then the LA riots happened less than five years later. Chung-bok Hong’s murder happened during my high school years. I remember feeling so grieved, and yet so glad my parents didn’t work in K-town anymore. I remember being worried about them every Sunday morning, when they went to downtown LA to pass out donuts and hot drinks to the homeless. 

I have a lot of feelings about this and very few coherent words. I think of my friend, whose mother was killed while manning her business. She was killed for $35 worth of clothes. I think of another good friend whose mother was robbed at gun point while in the passenger seat of her car. Her attacker broke into her car and drove off with her in it, demanding money from her. I think of my own mother, who often does the accounting and banking for her business every week. And the times she’s been attacked for money. The bruises they left. 

I think of every moment my mother or my friend’s mothers harassed us about studying harder, about getting well-paying jobs, about not living our lives the way they had to live theirs. 

I’m so glad Chung-bok Hong was able to live with so much generosity and grace. But I am so damn tired of seeing women I know and love get killed or beaten while trying to make a living for their families and children. I’m tired of seeing Korean women get killed while trying to run a business and raise a family. I know this story is fifteen years old, but it keeps happening and I am so weary. I’m so tired of the anti-Asian sentiment in the US that keeps people from seeing us, from seeing my mother and her friends, from seeing my people as human beings. 

(via the-goddamazon)

Anonymous said: these anons are like, "can i be racist in the rain? can i be racist on a train? can i be racist in a box? can i be racist with a fox?"

orchidassassin:

locksandglasses:

lackadaisicallexicon:

thesoftghetto:

surrealexperiences:

cyb3ranthy:

incogneeco:

whiteoppression:

famphic:

anthotny:

postracialcomments:

lmfaoooooooooooooo Yes!

Lmao!
How can I be racist if I work with blacks
How can I be racist if one sold me slacks
I’m not racist I’m just like you. I’m best friends with a black or two.

i’m not racist, you see, it’s just a preference
i love eastern culture and its women’s deference
the west lost its way with no room for clemency
If I love Asian women, how’s that white supremacy?

i’m not a racist, i can’t be, you see
my great grandma’s grandma was part cherokee
plus one time i got called “cracker” to my face
don’t we all bleed red? i don’t even see race…

I’m not racist, blacks just need to stop complaining
Living in the past and white people blaming
I work hard, no handouts for every little fraction
If white privilege isn’t fair, then how is affirmative action?

I’m not racist man, I’m just right-wing
Plus reverse-racism is totally a thing
It’s not about power check the definition
Slavery wasn’t an evil thing, just asset acquisition.

How come I can’t say “nigga”, it just means brotha!
And ain’t I a brotha from anotha motha?
I didn’t use the ‘er’- so its a total difference.
You blacks give good white people such hindrance :(

'We can't handle spicy foods' ? Your jokes make me sad

See, if I joked and called you a “nigger”, you’ll be mad

You black people think we are always out here to ruin your day

Look, 'not all white people', …mmkay?

I can say “nigga” ‘cause of freedom of speech

And y’all always forget what MLK preached!

White privilege ain’t real ‘cause my life is hard

If you want to stop racists, don’t play the race card

Blacks can oppress. Shoot, they’ve oppressed me

I was the only white kid and the blacks were so mean

So I called one a nigger, but clicked anon first

yeah racism is real, but like… I’ve had it worst.

Every time I reblog this, it gets more amazing.

indiohistorian:

A Documentary Every Filipino Needs to See: An IndioHistorian Film Review of “Gusto nang Umuwi ni Joy” 

It’s not usual for me to post anything unhistorical on this blog. I do take exceptions on films, plays and music that in their own way move me, not only as a historian, or as a Filipino, but as a person. The film, “Gusto nang Umuwi ni Joy” by director Jan Tristan Pandy is one of those exceptions.

The film debuts as part of GMA7’s Cine Totoo, the first Filipino international film documentary festival introducing this kind of films to Filipino audiences. The film is about Joy, an Overseas Filipino Worker (OFW) in the U.K. whose only wish was to be granted a visa so she could return home and be with her family without sacrificing the employment opportunity in London.

It is not uncommon to watch this kind of story on screen. Migration and being away for lengths of time from the Philippines is part of our DNA as a people, historically speaking. Even Rizal struggled with the same engulfing homesickness when he left the country to study in Europe. He said in his diary:

“…little by little, the buildings were becoming smaller, their outlines were becoming confused…That was my motherland, my dear motherland. There I left love and glory, parents who adore me, solicitous sisters, a brother who watchers over my family and me, and friends. Oh yes! How many loves, how many hearts, which could have made me happy, and nevertheless I’m abandoning them! Will I find them free, just as I have left them?”

Indeed, many directors, writers, and playwrights have adapted this OFW material to films and on stage, understandably so, since it is almost a universal experience today among Filipinos to have one, two or more loved ones—families and friends—who migrated, or work abroad to earn a living for the family they left behind.

And yet Pandy’s film stands out, simply because the treatment allowed him to focus on that one life, and in effect highlighting the struggle of that one life.

There were certain scenes that make me wonder how in the world was that captured on film. Joy, the Pinay with a family back home, who works as a helper for a British household, was well aware of the lens that was focused on her, following her wherever she went. What’s more, Joy, the subject of the documentary is actually the director’s aunt. And yet despite all that, there was nothing in the film that felt contrived. The film simply let Joy speak for herself. The genius of the film lies in its un-wordy telling of Joy’s story. Even in the breaks and silences whenever she spoke, the audience could feel the loneliness Joy felt—it was not told per se, it was shown implicitly, and unapologetically. And those silences and breaks build up, as near the end of the film, she seals one balikbayan box she sends to her family and stares at it long enough with a relieved sigh—alluding that all her hopes and dreams are on that box to be sent home.

One of the bittersweet scenes in the film was when she swipes her phone for photo after photo of her family, and talks to them—as if she was there with them—to somehow relieve the silent pain and the overwhelming loneliness she feels being separated from her family by oceans.

No one knows the suffering of Filipinos abroad, especially those who only had meager means to go there and risk their lives and security for “greener pastures.” We on the receiving end here in the Philippines do not have the slightest hint of what our loved ones go through, out there surrounded by the unfamiliarity (and at times, hostility). They hold back their fears, and just live out the drudgery, hoping that one day, all their sacrifices would pay off.

On a personal note, I was reminded of our kababayans who I got to interview in Singapore on March 2010. In an unkept mall in Singapore called the Lucky Plaza, droves of Filipinas just sit there to cool themselves and spend their idle weekend break. And when I interviewed them, seeing that I’m also Filipino, they treated me as their own, pouring out their painful stories as if I’m a son they left back home. One even showed me her back full of burns from a flat iron, thanks to the merciful “amo” who made her eat only one cup of rice every day. “Gusto ko na umuwi, pero hindi pwede kasi nag-aaral pa mga anak ko…” I remember thanking them, and walking away tearfully and helplessly.

When I watched “Gusto nang Umuwi ni Joy,” I remembered their faces, and countless more whose stories we would never get to hear—experiences more painful than that of Joy. The documentary stripped away the statistical figures and showed on screen a pulsating life of a person in quiet desperation. The film resonates because the sense of exile is an almost universal experience. While it never explicitly pushed any advocacy for the OFWs, the film simply told the story. An OFW was given a voice. And that was more than enough.

Amidst the good cinematography, and great editing, here is a Filipino film documentary, with a heart.

I give it 5 stars. Highly recommended.

Catch it while you still can on September 29, at SM Megamall Cinema, 6:30pm.

robothugscomic:

New Comic!

Apparently now that I’m not in school anymore I’m all about giant long-form comics. 

Identity is a really important topic to me, and the trope of ‘finding yourself’ is almost as problematic and insulting to me as the trope of ‘coming out’. 

I want to destroy the idea that some identities are less valid than others, the condescension that comes with ‘they’re just figuring themselves out’, and the insulting dismissal of identity exploration and performance in youth as being somehow not ‘real’, or as ‘attention seeking’. Fuck all of that. 

And beyond the fact that  ’inconsistent’ identities are really challenging socially, they ALSO carry these real, actual life and liberty risks; we’re expected to use the same name, orientations, values, languages, and identities across all aspects of our lives, we are expected to have normative identities that can be quantified and qualified and trust me, TRUST ME  when a person is perceived as having inconsistent or unusual identities they are being flagged in all sorts of systems for extra scrutiny and action. I know this from experience. 

So, yeah, this ‘one true identity’, this ‘finding yourself’, this ‘who is the real you’ stuff is bullshit. We are so, so much more interesting than that, and we deserve better.

(via babyslime)

themidwifeisin:

Buy these posters and find more from the amazing Repeal Hyde Art Project!

They are so amazing and speak so many truths - when I have my own clinic I’m going to put all of them up on the walls.  So beautiful!

(via face-down-asgard-up)

doingitdisneystyle:

oh-hai-its-lily:

rollad20andkissme:

madithefreckled:

I actually just looked this up and found out some interesting things.

Young MacGuffin speaks in a North East Doric dialect which obviously is hard to understand. Originally he was going to just speak gibberish but his voice actor, Kevin McKidd, suggested he try a few lines in Doric and Pixar loved it and kept it. Found a couple translations too, but only one of them applies to this gif set and that’s the third one after Merida gave her speech about letting them choose who they marry:

It’s just not fair making us fight for the hand of a girl who doesn’t want anything to do with it. You know?

OH MY GOD

this changes everything

ALL of the things.

(via the-goddamazon)

karnythia:

cypheroftyr:

syrenpan:

laterovaries:

icybluepenguin:

isis2005:

sixpenceee:

Chicago’s newest attraction - a 1000ft-high viewing platform that offers spectacular downward facing views over the city. TILT is housed in 360 CHICAGO on the 94th floor of the John Hancock Tower and, as the name suggests, the enclosed glass and steel platform tilts visitors forward for a unique perspective of the city’s The Magnificent Mile. (Source)

Nope nope nope!

I would scream so loud. If I was dumb enough to get even near that *shudder*

Fuck. That.
Kelli don’t do heights.

cypheroftyr
have you been there? What’s it like?

NOPE NOPE NOPE.  A WHOLE LOT OF FUCKING NOPE. Just watching the gif is freaking me out. I don’t do heights, roller coasters or anything like that. 
If any of my friends have gone, please let syrenpan know? 

I have not gone yet, but I’m planning to go for my birthday later this month. By then most of the tourist crowds will have died down & I’ll be able to linger & take pics. 

I imagine my kids or partner wanting to do it and my laying in the floor holding on to their ankles. NOPE!

karnythia:

cypheroftyr:

syrenpan:

laterovaries:

icybluepenguin:

isis2005:

sixpenceee:

Chicago’s newest attraction - a 1000ft-high viewing platform that offers spectacular downward facing views over the city. TILT is housed in 360 CHICAGO on the 94th floor of the John Hancock Tower and, as the name suggests, the enclosed glass and steel platform tilts visitors forward for a unique perspective of the city’s The Magnificent Mile. (Source)

Nope nope nope!

I would scream so loud. If I was dumb enough to get even near that *shudder*

Fuck. That.

Kelli don’t do heights.

cypheroftyr
have you been there? What’s it like?

NOPE NOPE NOPE.  A WHOLE LOT OF FUCKING NOPE. Just watching the gif is freaking me out. I don’t do heights, roller coasters or anything like that. 

If any of my friends have gone, please let syrenpan know? 

I have not gone yet, but I’m planning to go for my birthday later this month. By then most of the tourist crowds will have died down & I’ll be able to linger & take pics.

I imagine my kids or partner wanting to do it and my laying in the floor holding on to their ankles.

NOPE!

genderpunk-dragon:

bandersnatchery:

"Vancouver School Board Introduces Gender-Neutral Pronouns"

"Students and teachers in Vancouver can now use the gender-neutral pronouns "xe," "xem," and "xyr." The move is designed to accommodate students for whom "he" and "she" does not fit or is deemed inappropriate…
"The newly coined pronouns — xe, xem, and xyr — are pronounced to rhyme with the genderless plurals "they," "them," and "their," and all starting with the "z" sound. So phonetically speaking, they’re pronounced "zey, "zem", and "zare.""

(Source: io9)
Click here to read the full article.

the article doesn’t do the issue justice.
the issue regarded policy change, where the vancouver school board’s (VSB) LGBTQ+ advisory committee re-wrote existing policy to protect staff and students falling on the queer and trans spectrums. 
the policy revision includes
-they/them/their and non-traditional pronouns being recognized by the school system
-required used of preferred names and pronouns by all staff and students
-preferred names/pronouns on all school records
-gender-accesible washrooms and change rooms available to those who require them
-disciplinary action taken against those who act in a discriminatory or hateful manner towards students, staff, and families falling on the queer and trans spectrums
—————-
the consultation was the longest ever done by the VSB, with over 120 speakers spread across 3 meetings. 
the process also resulting in two school board trustees being ejected form their party’s caucus, due their discriminatory actions and arguments. 
these are links to stories by vancouver media about the issue
CBC
metro news
global BC
huffington post

genderpunk-dragon:

bandersnatchery:

"Vancouver School Board Introduces Gender-Neutral Pronouns"

"Students and teachers in Vancouver can now use the gender-neutral pronouns "xe," "xem," and "xyr." The move is designed to accommodate students for whom "he" and "she" does not fit or is deemed inappropriate…

"The newly coined pronouns — xe, xem, and xyr — are pronounced to rhyme with the genderless plurals "they," "them," and "their," and all starting with the "z" sound. So phonetically speaking, they’re pronounced "zey, "zem", and "zare.""

(Source: io9)

Click here to read the full article.

the article doesn’t do the issue justice.

the issue regarded policy change, where the vancouver school board’s (VSB) LGBTQ+ advisory committee re-wrote existing policy to protect staff and students falling on the queer and trans spectrums. 

the policy revision includes

-they/them/their and non-traditional pronouns being recognized by the school system

-required used of preferred names and pronouns by all staff and students

-preferred names/pronouns on all school records

-gender-accesible washrooms and change rooms available to those who require them

-disciplinary action taken against those who act in a discriminatory or hateful manner towards students, staff, and families falling on the queer and trans spectrums

—————-

the consultation was the longest ever done by the VSB, with over 120 speakers spread across 3 meetings. 

the process also resulting in two school board trustees being ejected form their party’s caucus, due their discriminatory actions and arguments. 

these are links to stories by vancouver media about the issue

CBC

metro news

global BC

huffington post

(via babyslime)

ottoreal:

"Let her speak when we get to the black topics."

Why does this not have a Billion notes!!!!!!

(Source: lordofthewolves, via afro-khaleesi)